HOME:  Dismissive Reviews in Education Policy Research
  Author Co-author(s) Subjective or Promotional comment   Title Source Funders Link1 Notes
1 U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation   "The report is the result of a collective effort with the nation’s leading education experts to create the most comprehensive analysis of the landmark education policies of the past two decades."    U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Releases First Comprehensive Analysis on Last 20 Years of K-12 Education Policies  Education Writers Association, April 3, 2023 U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation https://ewa.org/members-news/press-releases/research-reveals-outcomes-underserved-students-no-child-left-behind "most comprehensive analysis" of the work from their citation cartel
2 U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation "According to what Goldhaber and DeArmond identify as the most credible existing studies…" U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Releases First Comprehensive Analysis on Last 20 Years of K-12 Education Policies  Education Writers Association, April 3, 2023 U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation https://ewa.org/members-news/press-releases/research-reveals-outcomes-underserved-students-no-child-left-behind "most credible" being those studies from their citation cartel, whether right or wrong, good or bad
3 Sarah Schwartz   "What the most important studies have found—and what we still need to know.."   COVID Hurt Student Learning: Key Findings From a Year of Research Education Week, November 30, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/covid-hurt-student-learning-key-findings-from-a-year-of-research/2022/11  
4 Sarah Schwartz   "Here are four questions and answers, based on what we’ve learned from the most salient studies, that dig into the evidence."   COVID Hurt Student Learning: Key Findings From a Year of Research Education Week, November 30, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/covid-hurt-student-learning-key-findings-from-a-year-of-research/2022/11  
5 Benjamin Herold   In fact, a robust body of research suggests more technology actually tends to make longstanding inequities worse.   All That Ed Tech Schools Bought During the Pandemic Won’t Improve Equity. Here’s Why Education Week, November 28, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/technology/all-that-ed-tech-schools-bought-during-the-pandemic-wont-improve-equity-heres-why/2022/11  
6 Sarah D. Sparks   "The study is just the latest and most nationally comprehensive of a slew of new research on the pandemic’s effects on teachers’ mental health."   Pandemic Anxiety Was Higher for Teachers Than for Health-Care Workers Education Week, November 15, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/pandemic-anxiety-was-higher-for-teachers-than-for-health-care-workers/2022/11  
7 The Economist   " He [Edward Kennedy] collaborated with George W. Bush to set higher standards for public education."   The lion of liberalism; American politics Economist online, November 13, 2022      
8 Sarah Schwartz   "More recent research concludes that studies that used more tightly controlled methodology—such as more closely matched comparison groups for retained students and higher-quality statistical controls—show fewer negative consequences of retention."   What Does Research Say About Grade Retention? A Few Key Studies to Know Education Week, November 2, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/what-does-research-say-about-grade-retention-a-few-key-studies-to-know/2022/11  
9 Sarah Schwartz   "These stronger studies didn’t show negative effects, but they didn’t show positive results either."   What Does Research Say About Grade Retention? A Few Key Studies to Know Education Week, November 2, 2022 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/what-does-research-say-about-grade-retention-a-few-key-studies-to-know/2022/11  
10 Sarah Schwartz   "One landmark study found that students who couldn’t read on grade level by then were four times less likely to graduate high school on time than their peers who could."   Third Grade Reading Retention Is Back. Should It Be? Education Week, October 21, 2022 Education Week funders    
11 Anya Kamenetz   "A top researcher says it's time to rethink our entire approach to preschool"   A top researcher says it's time to rethink our entire approach to preschool National Public Radio, February 10, 2022 NPR funders    
12 Debra Viadero   "The National Bureau of Economic Research distributes high-quality working papers   Making Sense of Education Research Education Writers Association Blog, downloaded February 9, 2022 EWA funders https://www.ewa.org/education-research  
13 Jill Barshay   "Yet there were also striking success stories from rating teachers. Research documented giant student achievement improvements in Washington, D.C. ... which persist to this day."    Nationwide, evaluating and penalizing teachers rarely works Hechinger Report, Proof Points, December 13, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3)   Striking success only according to the researchers in her echo chamber--for example, the tautalogical Dee and Wyckoff study. See, for example, Phelps    http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n2.pdf   http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n3.pdf 
14 Jill Barshay   "There continues to be a lot of enthusiasm for teacher evaluation systems among education reformers. And because of the big successes in Washington, D.C., …"    Nationwide, evaluating and penalizing teachers rarely works Hechinger Report, Proof Points, December 13, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3)   Striking success only according to the researchers in her echo chamber--for example, the tautalogical Dee and Wyckoff study. See, for example, Phelps    http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n2.pdf   http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n3.pdf 
15 Stephen Sawchuk   "Now, the widest-reaching analysis of the practice [4-day school weeks]  to date paints a nuanced picture of the effects of the switch."   4-Day School Weeks: New Research Examines the Benefits and Drawbacks Education Week, October 7, 2021 Education Week funders; The study … was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. https://www.edweek.org/leadership/4-day-school-weeks-new-research-examines-the-benefits-and-drawbacks/2021/10  
16 Jill Barshay   "A seminal 2016 study sorted through almost 200 well-designed experiments on improving education from expanding preschool to reducing class size…"     Hechinger Report, Proof Points, , 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3)    
17 Jill Barshay   "Here’s a quick tour through more than five decades of muddy studies. … Until the 1980s, no one had designed a good experiment to see what happens to student achievement when you reduce class size."   PROOF POINTS: Pandemic relief money is flowing to class-size reduction but research evidence for it isn’t strong Hechinger Report, Proof Points, , 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-pandemic-relief-money-is-flowing-to-class-size-reduction-but-research-evidence-for-it-isnt-strong/  
18 Jill Barshay   "A 2018 review of all the high-quality class size experiments around the world, including the U.S., found at most small benefits to small classes when it comes to reading. In math, the review found no benefits at all."   PROOF POINTS: Pandemic relief money is flowing to class-size reduction but research evidence for it isn’t strong Hechinger Report, Proof Points, June 7, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-pandemic-relief-money-is-flowing-to-class-size-reduction-but-research-evidence-for-it-isnt-strong/ All the "high-quality" experiments in the world? Does that mean all the recent US studies done by the Ed Reform Citation Cartel she promotes?
19 Jill Barshay   "Rigorous studies have shown impressive academic performance in Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) charter schools, …"   PROOF POINTS: Could more time in school help students after the pandemic? Hechinger Report, Proof Points, May 24, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3)   Links to:  Edunomics Lab, Learning Policy Institute, Ed Trust, Chicago Consortium (2), Mathematica, Abt Associates(2), Harvard Kennedy School. …i.e., mostly the Ed Reform Citation Cartel
20 Jill Barshay   "He made enemies along the way, publicly disparaging studies that didn’t meet his high standards in his weekly blog. … And he insisted that the learning gains be measured by objective metrics, not by a researcher’s or a company’s own assessment."   PROOF POINTS: Robert Slavin championed the use of scientific evidence to figure out what works in education Hechinger Report, Proof Points, May 3, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-robert-slavin-championed-the-use-of-scientific-evidence-to-figure-out-what-works-in-education/ Implying that his standards are best and John Hattie's are just Hattie's personal opinion?  Isn't this article in poor taste? It uses the death of a person who deserves to be remembered well to unfairly bash someone else. I did a web search  to see if Barshay had ever talked to Hattie, and did not find any evidence that she had.
21 Jill Barshay   "Many of Slavin’s views on how to make proper sense of prior research came together in this 2016 article, where he argued that the failure to throw out low-quality studies can lead us astray. Slavin’s views are diametrically opposed to those of John Hattie, the bestselling author of “Visible Learning,” who has written several books about what works in education by factoring in all studies."   PROOF POINTS: Robert Slavin championed the use of scientific evidence to figure out what works in education Hechinger Report, Proof Points, May 3, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-robert-slavin-championed-the-use-of-scientific-evidence-to-figure-out-what-works-in-education/ Libelous nonsense. Hattie does not "factor in all studies." He meta-analyzes others' peer-reviewed meta-analyses which, themselves, had distilled some studies from many. Had Hattie culled the meta-analyses he summarized, he would have been accussed of cherry picking bias from the previously peer-reviewed works. No one forced Slavin to do research as Hattie has done it, and Hattie did not stop anyone from doing more focussed studies. But, to claim that Hattie's studies are harmful is blindly narrow-minded. Hattie's studies are very revealing.
22 Jill Barshay   "“John Hattie is wrong,” Slavin wrote. “Hattie and others who uncritically accept all studies, good and bad, are undermining the value of evidence.”   PROOF POINTS: Robert Slavin championed the use of scientific evidence to figure out what works in education Hechinger Report, Proof Points, May 3, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-robert-slavin-championed-the-use-of-scientific-evidence-to-figure-out-what-works-in-education/ Libelous nonsense. Hattie does not "factor in all studies." He meta-analyzes others' peer-reviewed meta-analyses which, themselves, had distilled some studies from many. Had Hattie culled the meta-analyses he summarized, he would have been accussed of cherry picking bias from the previously peer-reviewed works. No one forced Slavin to do research as Hattie has done it, and Hattie did not stop anyone from doing more focussed studies. But, to claim that Hattie's studies are harmful is blindly narrow-minded. Hattie's studies are very revealing.
23 Catherine Gewertz   Even though the study could not establish that more time spent on social studies is what causes better reading performance, she said, its solid design warrants attention to—and further study of—the nature of the connection between the two.   Does Social Studies Build Stronger Readers? A New Study Suggests So Education Week.September 25, 2020    https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/does-social-studies-build-stronger-readers-a-new-study-suggests-so/2020/09  
24 Gabrielle Wanneh   A new study from China offers some of the most extensive evidence to date on how the novel coronavirus affects children.   How Does Coronavirus Affect Children? Here Are the Latest Findings Education Week, March 20, 2020   https://www.edweek.org/education/how-does-coronavirus-affect-children-here-are-the-latest-findings/2020/03  
25 Gabrielle Wanneh   The study also provides strong evidence that human-to-human transmission plays a major role in the spread of COVID-19   How Does Coronavirus Affect Children? Here Are the Latest Findings Education Week, March 20, 2020   https://www.edweek.org/education/how-does-coronavirus-affect-children-here-are-the-latest-findings/2020/03  
26 Marta W. Aldrich   "The study examined access to gifted programs based on students’ family income, parental education, and occupational prestige, not just the traditional threshold of eligibility for free and reduced price lunch. That approach provided a deeper and wider look at the role of socioeconomic status and revealed some important divergences."   Money over merit? New study says gifted programs favor students from wealthier families Chalkbeat, October 4, 2019  Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/tn/2019/10/04/money-over-merit-new-study-says-gifted-programs-favor-students-from-wealthier-families/ Doubtful. Psychologists have long worked in the field of gifted education. Indeed, some have specialized in it, and have created a large, robust research literature. One can find much of it at web sites such as "Hoagie's Gifted" and those for the gifted education research centers such as: Belin-Blank (in Iowa); Josephson (in Nevada); Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (in Maryland); and Duke University's Talent Identification Program.
27 Matt Barnum Brian Gill (interviewee) "This is the first credible national study of the effects of charter schools on racial integration,” said Brian Gill, a researcher at Mathematica who has extensively studied charter schools. “This is a methodologically strong study that the field really needed.”   Do charters further segregate America’s schools? Yes, new study says, but most blame lies elsewhere Chalkbeat, July 24, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/07/24/charter-schools-racial-segregation-research/  
28 Matt Barnum   "Now, a first-of-its-kind national study offers some of the clearest answers to date about whether charter schools are contributing to racial segregation."   Do charters further segregate America’s schools? Yes, new study says, but most blame lies elsewhere Chalkbeat, July 24, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/07/24/charter-schools-racial-segregation-research/  
29 Matt Barnum   "according to a comprehensive study released last week by the RAND Corporation. It appears to be the first randomized trial — the gold standard in social science research — of restorative justice in schools, a practice that has taken hold across the country."   Major new study finds restorative justice led to safer schools, but hurt black students’ test scores Chalkbeat, January 4, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/01/04/the-first-gold-standard-study-of-restorative-justice-is-out-heres-what-it-tells-us/ Authors of the profiled study claimed that theirs was "one of the first;" journalist Barnum claims it to be "the first." Barnum cites a 2016 literature review, which itself: refers to several other randomized controlled trials of the topic funded at the same time by the same source (US DOJ) ( https://nij.gov/funding/awards/pages/awards-list.aspx?solicitationid=3878# ), admits its literature review is not exhaustive (see footnote 14); and, apparently, performed only a web search. Of the literature review's 69 references, one emanates from 1993, another from 1998, and all the rest from after the year 2000, with half from after 2009.  Research from 1999-2014 is called "early research." Reporter accepts self-interested researcher's word that their work is "rigorous" &"more sophisticated" and everything done earlier was crummy. A "void" in the research is determined by a search with two keywords in a single web-based index that, nonetheless, found 157 studies--though less than a couple dozen are referenced, and none predate 2002.
30 Matt Barnum   "Now, we’re closer to some answers. Three of four recent studies on the topic provide some of the strongest evidence yet that suspensions do in fact harm students’ academic performance.   Suspensions really do hurt students academically, new studies confirm, but maybe less than previously thought. Chalkbeat, August 23, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/08/23/suspensions-really-do-hurt-students-academically-new-studies-confirm-but-maybe-less-than-previously-thought/ As evidence that little previous research exists, Barnum simply cites another author, in an Education Next article, who makes the claim ex cathedra.
31 Sarah D. Sparks For all the debates around the most effective teachers, curriculua, school structures, and so on, a massive new research analysis finds that formal education, in general, remains “the most consistent, robust, and durable method yet to be identified for raising intelligence Yes, School Does Permanently Boost IQ, Study Finds Education Week, June 25, 2018 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/yes-school-does-permanently-boost-iq-study-finds/2018/06#:~:text=But%20more%20importantly%20for%20teachers,have%20an%20IQ%20above%20130.
32 Sarah D. Sparks In fact, the most comprehensive study to date suggests the size and even the direction of gender gaps vary from one school district to another. Why Do Some of the Nation’s Wealthiest Districts Have the Worst Gender Gaps in Math and Reading? Education Week, June 13, 2018 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/leadership/why-do-some-of-the-nations-wealthiest-districts-have-the-worst-gender-gaps-in-math-and-reading/2018/06
33 Jill Barshay   "A pair of researchers recently took another stab at the question of how test prep affects the classroom and wondered if better tests might shake things up. If a test isn’t just multiple-choice questions and asks students challenging math problems that require them to think, would the test preparation time be productive instructional time? That’s a particularly relevant question now that more than 20 states have adopted new, more rigorous exams alongside Common Core standards." p.2   Proof Points: Better tests don’t lead to better teaching, study finds Hechinger Report, November 13, 2017 (also appeared in U. S. News & World Report) Hechinger Report funders (3)   In fact the test prep, or test coaching, literature is vast and dates back decades, with meta-analyses of the literature dating back at least to the 1970s. There's even a What Works Clearinghouse summary of the (post World Wide Web) college admission test prep research literature:  https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/InterventionReports/wwc_act_sat_100416.pdf . See also: Gilmore (1927)   DeWeerdt (1927)  French (1959) French & Dear (1959)  Ortar (1960)  Marron (1965)  ETS (1965). Messick & Jungeblut (1981)  Ellis, Konoske, Wulfeck, & Montague (1982)  DerSimonian and Laird (1983)  Kulik, Bangert-Drowns & Kulik (1984)  Powers (1985)  Samson (1985) Scruggs, White, & Bennion (1986) Jones (1986). Fraker (1986/1987)  Halpin (1987)  Whitla (1988)  Snedecor (1989)  Bond (1989). Baydar (1990)  Becker (1990)  Smyth (1990)  Moore (1991)  Alderson & Wall (1992)  Powers (1993)  Oren (1993). Powers & Rock (1994)  Scholes, Lane (1997)   Allalouf & Ben Shakhar (1998)  Robb & Ercanbrack (1999)  McClain (1999)  Camara (1999, 2001, 2008) Stone & Lane (2000, 2003)  Din & Soldan (2001)  Briggs (2001)  Palmer (2002)  Briggs & Hansen (2004)  Cankoy & Ali Tut (2005)  Crocker (2005)  Allensworth, Correa, & Ponisciak (2008)  Domingue & Briggs (2009)  Koljatic & Silva (2014)  Early (2019)  Herndon (2021)
34 Jill Barshay   "Opponents of testing typically argue that test prep lessons crowd out the kind of sophisticated instruction valued by Hill’s Mathematical Quality of Instruction (MQI) scale." p.4   Proof Points: Better tests don’t lead to better teaching, study finds Hechinger Report, November 13, 2017 (also appeared in U. S. News & World Report) Hechinger Report funders (3)    
35 Jill Barshay   "... described how students spent an entire hour doing multiple-choice practice questions and received no feedback other than whether they were right or wrong. In another low-quality lesson, the teacher spent a lot of time on a mnemonic for rounding decimals, without making sense of the procedure." p.5   Proof Points: Better tests don’t lead to better teaching, study finds Hechinger Report, November 13, 2017 (also appeared in U. S. News & World Report) Hechinger Report funders (3)    
36 Matt Barnum   "Chalkbeat combed through some of the most rigorous academic studies to get the answers."   Do school vouchers ‘work’? As the debate heats up, here’s what research really says Chalkbeat, July 12, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/07/12/do-school-vouchers-work-as-the-debate-heats-up-heres-what-research-really-says/  
37 Matt Barnum   "Careful studies are currently in the works regarding the impacts of the school disciplinary changes sweeping the country."   The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
38 Benjamin Herold " ... the Regional Education Laboratory Central (a contractor for the Institute of Education Sciences, which is the research agency for the federal education department) released late last month a summary of 17 of the highest-quality research studies of online and blended-learning software programs." Research Review: Which Blended-Learning Software Actually Works? Education Week.March 16, 2017  Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/technology/research-review-which-blended-learning-software-actually-works/2017/03
39 Benjamin Herold   "In 2015, Pane and his RAND colleagues undertook the field’s most comprehensive study to date.   Personalized Learning: What Does the Research Say? Education Week, October 18, 2016 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/technology/personalized-learning-what-does-the-research-say/2016/10 The Rand Corporation's Pane claims that no prior research exists, except for another Rand study, and then,  admits that there exist some relevant mastery learning studies from the 1980s. He implies, however, that there were only one or a few. In fact, there were hundreds. There have also been thousands  of studies of personalized instruction in conjunction with studies in special education, tutoring, teachers' aides, tracking, etc. 
40 Benjamin Herold   "Perhaps the most-cited research into a particular digital tool used to support personalized learning is RAND’s 2013 research .... The study was a rigorous randomized-control trial, undertaken in a variety of real-world schools, putting it pretty close to the gold standard for education research."   Personalized Learning: What Does the Research Say? Education Week, October 18, 2016 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/technology/personalized-learning-what-does-the-research-say/2016/10 The Rand Corporation's Pane claims that no prior research exists, except for another Rand study, and then,  admits that there exist some relevant mastery learning studies from the 1980s. He implies, however, that there were only one or a few. In fact, there were hundreds. There have also been thousands  of studies of personalized instruction in conjunction with studies in special education, tutoring, teachers' aides, tracking, etc. 
41 Matt Barnum   "Polikoff recently sent around a new, particularly rigorous research paper, …"   The Fact Check: What if No Child Left Behind Worked and Nobody Realized It? Blame the Media The 74, September 30, 2015 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/what-if-no-child-left-behind-worked-and-nobody-realized-it-blame-the-media/ A "fact check" for Matt Barnum is whatever the small clique of researchers he likes says is fact.
42 Matt Barnum   "TNTP’s report makes a useful contribution that should spur policymakers to re-examine .."   Inside the New TNTP Research: Is Teacher Training Just An Expensive Waste of Time? The 74, August 4, 2015 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/inside-the-new-tntp-research-is-teacher-training-just-an-expensive-waste-of-time/  
43 Matt Barnum   "There is rigorous research showing that such policies can drive teacher improvement." [referring to the tautalogical Dee & Wyckoff study of DC's IMPACT program]   Inside the New TNTP Research: Is Teacher Training Just An Expensive Waste of Time? The 74, August 4, 2015 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/inside-the-new-tntp-research-is-teacher-training-just-an-expensive-waste-of-time/ Striking success only according to the researchers in his echo chamber--for example, the tautalogical Dee and Wyckoff study. See, for example, Phelps    http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n2.pdf   http://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Testimonials/v16n3.pdf 
44 Jill Barshay   "A new study  ...  by Notre Dame sociologist Megan Andrew … is an empirically solid analysis that adds more weight to those who say
retention — what education wonks call repeating a grade — is ultimately harmful."
  New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014, article also appeared in Washington Monthly Hechinger Report funders (3)    
45 Jill Barshay   "Andrew mined two large data sets in a way no researcher has done before…"   New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014, article also appeared in Washington Monthly Hechinger Report funders (3)    
46 Jill Barshay   "Those urban experiments attracted sophisticated researchers. Brian Jacob and Lars Lefgren studied students in Chicago, where the decision to hold a student back was based on a test score."   New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014, article also appeared in Washington Monthly Hechinger Report funders (3)    
47 Sarah D. Sparks   "An unprecedented research project in one Virginia community, the Roanoke Brain Study, uses    The Mechanics of the Brain Education Week, August 07, 2012 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/the-mechanics-of-the-brain  
48 Ann Bradley   "A comprehensive study of a Minnesota welfare-reform initiative has found positive effects for children and families, including less poverty, more stable marriages, and better school performance."   Study Finds Positive Effects From Minn. Welfare Policies Education Week, June 07, 2000 Education Week funders https://www.edweek.org/education/study-finds-positive-effects-from-minn-welfare-policies/2000/06  
49 Robert Rothman   "Though Cannell's methods were flawed and he overstated his case, …" p.51   Measuring Up: Standards, Assessment, and School Reform Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995   "This book would not have come about without the support of two extraordinary groups of people, to whom I owe inclculable debt." CRESST, Dean Ted Mitchell, Director Eva Baker; Education Week, Editors Ron Wolk, Ginny Edwards. Also, Steve Ferrara, Chester Finn, Joan Herman, Laura Resnick  Rothman claims correctly there were likely multiple causes for test score inflation, including outdated norms and genuine improved student achievement. Then, he suggests that Cannell had insisted that there was only one cause--cheating. That is false. Cannell specifically acknowledged other possible causes. See https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cannell&pg=2&id=ED314454
50 Robert Rothman   "To those familiar with testing—the finding—confirmed by a federally sponsored study by leading experts—pointed up many of the problems brought on by reliance on high-stakes testing. In any event, Cannell's small, crude study helped fuel a mounting criticism of the enterprise." p.52   Measuring Up: Standards, Assessment, and School Reform Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995   "This book would not have come about without the support of two extraordinary groups of people, to whom I owe inclculable debt." CRESST, Dean Ted Mitchell, Director Eva Baker; Education Week, Editors Ron Wolk, Ginny Edwards. Also, Steve Ferrara, Chester Finn, Joan Herman, Laura Resnick  Cannell surveyed education departments in all fifty states and, in states where districts made all the testing decisions, the larger districts within each state. He was unusually successful in retrieving responses, which required many hours and persistence. It was was an enormous undertaking, and very revealing. Most states and districts admitted that were not following many professional test security standards. See https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cannell&pg=2&id=ED314454 
51 Robert Rothman   "And as a big man with a booming baritone voice, Cannell was able to make himself heard from statehouses to the corridors of the the U.S. Education Department." p.52   Measuring Up: Standards, Assessment, and School Reform Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995   "This book would not have come about without the support of two extraordinary groups of people, to whom I owe inclculable debt." CRESST, Dean Ted Mitchell, Director Eva Baker; Education Week, Editors Ron Wolk, Ginny Edwards. Also, Steve Ferrara, Chester Finn, Joan Herman, Laura Resnick  Cannell was exactly right. There was corruption, lax security, and cheating. See, for example, https://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Articles/v6n3.htm
52 Robert Rothman   "To Cannell, the high scores reflected flagrant cheating. … This charge lent an air of sensationalism to Cannell's already provacative findings and helped attract even more publicity for them. … Cannell began receiving letters from other teachers around the country confessing their own misdeeds or charging others with committing similar ones." p.56   Measuring Up: Standards, Assessment, and School Reform Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995   "This book would not have come about without the support of two extraordinary groups of people, to whom I owe inclculable debt." CRESST, Dean Ted Mitchell, Director Eva Baker; Education Week, Editors Ron Wolk, Ginny Edwards. Also, Steve Ferrara, Chester Finn, Joan Herman, Laura Resnick  Rothman claims correctly there were likely multiple causes for test score inflation, including outdated norms and genuine improved student achievement. Then, he suggests that Cannell had insisted that there was only one cause--cheating. That is false. Cannell specifically acknowledged other possible causes. See https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cannell&pg=2&id=ED314454
                   
      Author cites (and accepts without checking) someone elses dismissive review            
      Cite selves or colleagues in the group, but dismiss or denigrate all other work            
Falsely claim that research has only recently been done on topic.
                 
                 
      (1) [as of January, 2019] Ann & Hal Logan via The Denver Foundation*; Anna and John J. Sie Foundation*; Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; Awesome Without Borders; Azita Raji and Gary Syman; Ben & Lucy Ana Walton*; Better Education Institute, Inc.; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation;Brett Family Foundation; Brooke Brown via the Carson Foundation*; Buell Foundation; Carnegie Corporation of New York; Carson Foundation; Chan Zuckerberg Initiative; Charles H. Revson Foundation; Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation; Christopher Gabrieli; CME Group; COGEN Co-working; Community Foundation of Greater Memphis; Community Foundation of New Jersey; Democracy Fund; Donnell-Kay Foundation; Doug and Wendy Kreeger; EdChoice; EDU21C Foundation; Elaine Berman; Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Inc.; Elizabeth Aybar Conti; Elizabeth Haas Edersheim (In Kind); Emma Bloomberg; Ford Foundation; Fry Foundation; Fund for Nonprofit News at The Miami Foundation; Gail Klapper; Gates Family Foundation; GEM Foundation; George T. Cameron Education Foundation; Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation partnership with the Knight Foundation; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (In Kind);  J.R. Hyde III Family Foundation Donor Advised Fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis;  Jim and Marsha McCormick; Kate Kennedy Reinemund and Jim Kennedy; Ken Hirsh; Kresge Foundation; La Vida Feliz Foundation; Lenfest Community Listening and Engagement Fund; Lilly Endowment Inc.; Maher Foundation; Margulf Foundation; Mark Zurack; Memphis Education Fund; Naomi and Michael Rosenfeld; Overdeck Family Foundation; Debra and Paul Appelbaum; Peter and Carmen L. Buck Foundation; Polk Bros. Foundation; Quinn Family Foundation; Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation; Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation, Inc.; Rick Smith; Rob Gary and Chris Watney; Rob Gary via the Piton Foundation*; Robert J. Yamartino and Maxine Sclar; Robert R. McCormick Foundation; Rose Community Foundation; Scott Gleason of O’Melveny & Myers (In Kind); Scott Pearl; Silicon Valley Community Foundation; Skift (In Kind); Spencer Foundation; Steans Family Foundation; Sue Lehmann; Susan Sawyers; Thalla-Marie and Heeten Choxi; The Assisi Foundation; The Anschutz Foundation; The Barton Family Foundation, a donor-advised fund of The Denver Foundation*; The Caswell Jin Foundation; The Colorado Health Foundation; The Colorado Trust; The Crown Family; The Denver Foundation; The Durst Organization (In Kind); The Glick Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation; The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate; The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation; The Joyce Foundation; The McGregor Fund; The Moriah Fund; The Skillman Foundation; The Walton Family Foundation; Victoria Foundation; Walentas Foundation Ltd.; Washington Square Legal Services/NYU Business Transactions Clinic (In Kind); Wend Ventures; Widmeyer, A FinnPartners Company (In Kind); Will and Christina McConathy*; W.K. Kellogg Foundation; Yoobi (In Kind)
      (2) [as of January, 2019] See  https://www.the74million.org/supporters/  "Partners" include:  Triad Foundation, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Park Avenue Charitable Trust, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, California Community Foundation, Doris & Donald Fisher Fund, Gen Next Foundation, Karsh Family Foundation, Jon Sackler, William E. Simon Foundation, Charles Strauch, Walton Family Foundation.
    (3) [as of September, 2021] See https://hechingerreport.org/supporters/  Grants: American Student Assistance, Arnold Ventures, Ascendium, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Philanthropies, ECMC Foundation, Imaginable Futures, Lumina Foundation for Education, Overdeck Family Foundation, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, The Spencer Foundation, The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, The Wallace Foundation, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; Sponsorships: Edwin Gould Foundation, SXSWEDU; Organizations: American Institutes for Research, Atlantic Media, Inc., The Fund for Nonprofit News at The Miami Foundation; Individual Donors: Editor-in-Chief’s Circle: Celeste Ford, Elizabeth Weatherford; Editors’ Circle: Robert King, Susan Sawyers, Kim and Joe Willen; Reporter’s Circle: Kiki Keating, David Garland, John Hechinger, Kathryn Parks, Joan Motyka, Fredric Leopold, Elizabeth Bass,Peter Blauner, Stephen Mongeau and Janice Ruell, Arthur Levine, Scott Widmeyer, Jeevan Padiyar, Christopher Mobley, Patricia Nadosy; Intern Circle: Soma Behr, Richard Melcher
(4) [as of January, 2019] Education Week funders [https://www.edweek.org/info/about/philanthropy.html]  "Our Funders": Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Carnegie Corporation of New York; Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation; Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust; Jack Kent Cooke Foundation; Joyce Foundation; Charles Stewart Mott Foundation; NoVo Foundation; Noyce Foundation; Raikes Foundation; Schott Foundation for Public Education; Wallace Foundation; Walton Family Foundation.
(5) Ascendium Education Group, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Funders for Adolescent Science Translation, The Joyce Foundation, The Kern Family Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Lumina Foundation, Pritzker Children’s Initiative, The Spencer Foundation, The Wallace Foundation, The Walton Family Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, W.T. Grant Foundation, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, EGF Accelerator, American Institutes for Research, American Federation of Teachers, The Aspen Education & Society Program, National Education Association