HOME:  Dismissive Reviews in Education Policy Research
  Author Co-author(s) Dismissive Quote type Title Source Funders Link1 Notes
1 Sarah Butrymowicz   "First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides" 1stness First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
2 Sarah Butrymowicz   "The Department of Education’s findings provide more evidence of racial disparities in career and technical education, first identified in a Hechinger Report/Associated Press analysis last year" 1stness First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
3 Sarah Butrymowicz   "Career and technical education advocates have long called for data that breaks down enrollment by race and ethnicity." 1stness First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
4 Sarah Butrymowicz   "Those statistics, released for the first time as part of new federal data on student enrollment in career and technical programs." 1stness First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
5 Sarah Butrymowicz   "Yet CTE advocates have long had concerns — but little proof — about inequities that lie beneath the surface." Dismissive First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
6 Sarah Butrymowicz   "Previously, the Department of Education only reported enrollment in CTE career areas by gender. The 2018 reauthorization of the federal law that governs career and technical education mandated racial data be reported as well." Dismissive First nationwide look at racial breakdown of career education confirms deep divides Hechinger Report, September 16, 2021 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/first-nationwide-look-at-racial-breakdown-of-career-education-confirms-deep-divides/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
7 Sarah Butrymowicz Jeff Amy, Larry Fenn "The analysis offers a comprehensive look at data that states will be required to report to the federal government at the end of this year under the Carl D. Perkins Act. The $1.2 billion law that oversees career and technical education at the federal level was reauthorized in 2018 with an increased focus on equity. Previously, such data was only required to be reported by gender, where large disparities are also seen." Dismissive How career and technical education shuts out Black and Latino students from highpaying professions Hechinger Report, October 22, 2020 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/how-career-and-technical-education-shuts-out-black-and-latino-students-from-high-paying-professions/ No. See: https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=093. …and click on "expand all"
8 Jill Barshay Daniel Koretz [interviewee] " In this country, we treat education data as the private sandbox of superintendents and commissioners. This is entirely different from how we treat data in other areas of public policy, such as medicine or airline safety." Dismissive PROOF POINTS: 5 Questions for Daniel Koretz  Hechinger Report, July 13, 2020 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-5-five-questions-for-daniel-koretz/ There are privacy controls on student data; there should probably be more and they should probably be enforced more vigourously. But, such controls are even stronger with medical data, which Koretz seems to imply here are weaker. Nonetheless, access to anonymized student data is granted all the time. Externally administered high-stakes testing is widely reviled among US educationists. It strains credulity that Koretz can not find one district out of the many thousands to cooperate with him to conduct a study to discredit testing.  
9 Jill Barshay Daniel Koretz [interviewee] "And so there aren’t that many studies, but the ones we have are quite consistent." Dismissive PROOF POINTS: 5 Questions for Daniel Koretz  Hechinger Report, July 13, 2020 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-5-five-questions-for-daniel-koretz/ In fact the test prep, or test coaching, literature is vast and dates back decades, with meta-analyses of the literature dating back at least to the 1970s. There's even a What Works Clearinghouse summary of the (post World Wide Web) college admission test prep research literature:  https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/InterventionReports/wwc_act_sat_100416.pdf .  See also: Gilmore (1927)   DeWeerdt (1927)  French (1959) French & Dear (1959)  Ortar (1960)  Marron (1965)  ETS (1965). Messick & Jungeblut (1981)  Ellis, Konoske, Wulfeck, & Montague (1982)  DerSimonian and Laird (1983)  Kulik, Bangert-Drowns & Kulik (1984)  Powers (1985)  Jones (1986). Fraker (1986/1987)  Halpin (1987)  Whitla (1988)  Snedecor (1989)  Bond (1989). Baydar (1990)  Becker (1990)  Smyth (1990)  Moore (1991)  Alderson & Wall (1992)  Powers (1993)  Oren (1993). Powers & Rock (1994)  Scholes, Lane (1997)   Allalouf & Ben Shakhar (1998)  Robb & Ercanbrack (1999)  McClain (1999)  Camara (1999, 2001, 2008) Stone & Lane (2000, 2003)  Din & Soldan (2001)  Briggs (2001)  Palmer (2002)  Briggs & Hansen (2004)  Cankoy & Ali Tut (2005)  Crocker (2005)  Allensworth, Correa, & Ponisciak (2008)  Domingue & Briggs (2009)  Koljatic & Silva (2014)  Early (2019) The many experimental studies of test coaching are consistent, it has some modest effect, and not the volatile or very large effects that Koretz claims.  
10 Jill Barshay Daniel Koretz [interviewee] "Experts have been writing about test score inflation since at least 1951. It’s not news but people have willfully ignored it." Denigrating PROOF POINTS: 5 Questions for Daniel Koretz  Hechinger Report, July 13, 2020 Hechinger Report funders (3) https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-5-five-questions-for-daniel-koretz/ Seems hypocritical. The most famous, and most honest, study of test score inflation--which primarily blamed cheating, corruption, and lax test security for it--was conducted by John J. Cannell in the mid 1980s. Koretz and his colleagues at CRESST have misrepresented Cannell's reports for three decades. More recently, Koretz has claimed that he conducted the first test score inflation study around 1990.  
11 Marta W. Aldrich   "The findings, published this week in the Harvard Educational Review, aren’t a surprise. Previous research using data in multiple states and districts have come to similar conclusions. But it’s the first study to use national data and also to factor in achievement results."  1stness Money over merit? New study says gifted programs favor students from wealthier families Chalkbeat, October 4, 2019  Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/tn/2019/10/04/money-over-merit-new-study-says-gifted-programs-favor-students-from-wealthier-families/  
12 Marta W. Aldrich   "The study examined access to gifted programs based on students’ family income, parental education, and occupational prestige, not just the traditional threshold of eligibility for free and reduced price lunch. That approach provided a deeper and wider look at the role of socioeconomic status and revealed some important divergences." Denigrating Money over merit? New study says gifted programs favor students from wealthier families Chalkbeat, October 4, 2019  Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/tn/2019/10/04/money-over-merit-new-study-says-gifted-programs-favor-students-from-wealthier-families/  
13 Marta W. Aldrich Jason Grissom (interviewee) "We just don’t have good evidence on whether that kind of training is effective or not" Dismissive Money over merit? New study says gifted programs favor students from wealthier families Chalkbeat, October 4, 2019  Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/tn/2019/10/04/money-over-merit-new-study-says-gifted-programs-favor-students-from-wealthier-families/  
14 Matt Barnum Brian Gill (interviewee) "“This is the first credible national study of the effects of charter schools on racial integration,” said Brian Gill, a researcher at Mathematica who has extensively studied charter schools. “This is a methodologically strong study that the field really needed.” 1stness Do charters further segregate America’s schools? Yes, new study says, but most blame lies elsewhere Chalkbeat, July 24, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/07/24/charter-schools-racial-segregation-research/  
15 Matt Barnum   "Now, a first-of-its-kind national study offers some of the clearest answers to date about whether charter schools are contributing to racial segregation." 1stness Do charters further segregate America’s schools? Yes, new study says, but most blame lies elsewhere Chalkbeat, July 24, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/07/24/charter-schools-racial-segregation-research/  
16 Matt Barnum   "A few months ago, I was at an education research conference where the preliminary results of a provocative study were presented. The research is among the first national, rigorous attempts to try answer an increasingly pressing question: Are charter schools exacerbating racial segregation?" 1stness Do charter schools make segregation worse? Chalkbeat, July 24, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/us/rise-and-shine/do-charter-schools-make-segregation-worse/  
17 Matt Barnum   "But amid the fierce debates, there has been virtually no research on whether the standards were actually accomplishing their goal of improving student learning." Dismissive Nearly a decade later, did the Common Core work? New research offers clues Chalkbeat, April 29, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/04/29/common-core-work-research/ The education policy researchers Barnum talks to have received money from the foundations promoting Common Core. For other evidence, look at the reports, and the research those reports cite, at the few think tanks that rejected Gates Foundation funds, such as the Pioneer Institute. 
18 Matt Barnum citing CALDER report "There’s very little other research on the Common Core. A 2015 Kentucky study showed students who were exposed to the standards made larger gains than students who weren’t." Dismissive Nearly a decade later, did the Common Core work? New research offers clues Chalkbeat, April 29, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/04/29/common-core-work-research/ The education policy researchers Barnum talks to have received money from the foundations promoting Common Core. For other evidence, look at the reports, and the research those reports cite, at the few think tanks that rejected Gates Foundation funds, such as the Pioneer Institute. 
19 Matt Barnum   "One potential response would be to raise the bar to graduate through high school exit exams. But research has shown that this approach has few clear benefits while increasing dropout rates, particularly among black and Hispanic students." Dismissive Across U.S., graduation rates are rising, with little connection to test scores Chalkbeat, January 28, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/01/28/graduation-rates-test-score-disconnect/ "the research" to which he refers is a small, selective part of the research literature on the topic
20 Matt Barnum   "according to a comprehensive study released last week by the RAND Corporation. It appears to be the first randomized trial — the gold standard in social science research — of restorative justice in schools, a practice that has taken hold across the country." 1stness Major new study finds restorative justice led to safer schools, but hurt black students’ test scores Chalkbeat, January 4, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/01/04/the-first-gold-standard-study-of-restorative-justice-is-out-heres-what-it-tells-us/ Authors of the profiled study claimed that theirs was "one of the first;" journalist Barnum claims it to be "the first." Barnum cites a 2016 literature review, which itself: refers to several other randomized controlled trials of the topic funded at the same time by the same source (US DOJ) ( https://nij.gov/funding/awards/pages/awards-list.aspx?solicitationid=3878# ), admits its literature review is not exhaustive (see footnote 14); and, apparently, performed only a web search. Of the literature review's 69 references, one emanates from 1993, another from 1998, and all the rest from after the year 2000, with half from after 2009.  Research from 1999-2014 is called "early research." Reporter accepts self-interested researcher's word that their work is "rigorous" &"more sophisticated" and everything done earlier was crummy. A "void" in the research is determined by a search with two keywords in a single web-based index that, nonetheless, found 157 studies--though less than a couple dozen are referenced, and none predate 2002.
21 Matt Barnum   "For now, the study is one part of a small body of research looking at whether these kinds of alternative discipline strategies work." Dismissive Major new study finds restorative justice led to safer schools, but hurt black students’ test scores Chalkbeat, January 4, 2019 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2019/01/04/the-first-gold-standard-study-of-restorative-justice-is-out-heres-what-it-tells-us/ Authors of the profiled study claimed that theirs was "one of the first;" journalist Barnum claims it to be "the first." Barnum cites a 2016 literature review, which itself: refers to several other randomized controlled trials of the topic funded at the same time by the same source (US DOJ) ( https://nij.gov/funding/awards/pages/awards-list.aspx?solicitationid=3878# ), admits its literature review is not exhaustive (see footnote 14); and, apparently, performed only a web search. Of the literature review's 69 references, one emanates from 1993, another from 1998, and all the rest from after the year 2000, with half from after 2009.  Research from 1999-2014 is called "early research." Reporter accepts self-interested researcher's word that their work is "rigorous" &"more sophisticated" and everything done earlier was crummy. A "void" in the research is determined by a search with two keywords in a single web-based index that, nonetheless, found 157 studies--though less than a couple dozen are referenced, and none predate 2002.
22 Matt Barnum   "A trio of recent studies were among the first to document that teachers are more effective when they first taught under the supervision of high-quality teacher." 1stness What worked (and didn’t) this year: 10 lessons from education research to take into 2019 Chalkbeat, December 21, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/12/21/education-research-2018/  
23 Matt Barnum   "The annual ritual of state testing in elementary and middle schools often comes within an unwelcome side effect: jittery, stressed-out kids.... Now, a first-of-its-kind study documents some of what’s actually happening to students." 1stness How the stress of state testing might make it harder for some students to show what they know Chalkbeat, December 13, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/12/13/stress-testing-research/  
24 Matt Barnum   "The study appears to be the first to look at this phenomenon specifically." 1stness Students show up to school more often when they see ‘familiar faces,’ new study finds Chalkbeat, November 28, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/11/28/attendance-peers-looping-students-stability-familiar-faces/  
25 Matt Barnum   "Now new research backs up Vazquez’s experience, documenting for perhaps the first time the steep consequences for students after teachers leave a classroom in middle of the school year." 1stness New research shows just how much losing a teacher midyear hurts students Chalkbeat, October 23, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/10/23/teacher-turnover-midyear-hurts-students/  
26 Matt Barnum   "But there’s been little reliable evidence that suspensions are the true cause of poor test scores or dismal graduation rates." Dismissive, Denigrating Suspensions really do hurt students academically, new studies confirm, but maybe less than previously thought. Chalkbeat, August 23, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/08/23/suspensions-really-do-hurt-students-academically-new-studies-confirm-but-maybe-less-than-previously-thought/ As evidence that little previous research exists, Barnum simply cites another author, in an Education Next article, who makes the claim ex cathedra.
27 Matt Barnum   "Now, we’re closer to some answers. Three of four recent studies on the topic provide some of the strongest evidence yet that suspensions do in fact harm students’ academic performance. Dismissive, Denigrating Suspensions really do hurt students academically, new studies confirm, but maybe less than previously thought. Chalkbeat, August 23, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/08/23/suspensions-really-do-hurt-students-academically-new-studies-confirm-but-maybe-less-than-previously-thought/ As evidence that little previous research exists, Barnum simply cites another author, in an Education Next article, who makes the claim ex cathedra.
28 Matt Barnum   "Do student teachers learn more when they’re mentored by especially effective teachers? The answer may seem obvious, but there’s been little research confirming as much. Until now." 1stness Mentors matter: Good teaching really can be passed down to student teachers, new research finds Chalkbeat, July 16, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/07/16/mentors-matter-good-teaching-really-can-be-passed-down-to-student-teachers-new-research-finds/ As evidence that little previous research exists, Barnum simply cites another author, in an Education Next article, who makes the claim ex cathedra.
29 Matt Barnum   "As school districts across the country have cut back on suspensions, critics claimed that the changes have led to chaos in the classroom. But there’s been remarkably little hard evidence either for or against that view." Dismissive, Denigrating When Chicago cut down on suspensions, students saw test scores and attendance rise, study finds Chalkbeat, March 13, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/03/13/when-chicago-cut-down-on-suspensions-students-saw-test-scores-and-attendance-rise-study-finds/ As evidence that little previous research exists, Barnum simply cites another author, in an Education Next article, who makes the claim ex cathedra.
30 Matt Barnum Daniel Koretz [interviewee] Journalist: I take it it’s very hard to quantify this test prep phenomenon, though? Koretz: It is extremely hard, and there’s a big hole in the research in this area. Dismissive Why one Harvard professor calls American schools’ focus on testing a ‘charade’ Chalkbeat, January 19, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/01/19/why-one-harvard-professor-calls-american-schools-focus-on-testing-a-charade/ In fact the test prep, or test coaching, literature is vast and dates back decades, with meta-analyses of the literature dating back at least to the 1970s. There's even a What Works Clearinghouse summary of the (post World Wide Web) college admission test prep research literature:  https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/InterventionReports/wwc_act_sat_100416.pdf . See also: Gilmore (1927)  French & Dear (1959)  Ortar (1960)  Marron (1965)  ETS (1965). Messick & Jungeblut (1981)  Ellis, Konoske, Wulfeck, & Montague (1982)  DerSimonian and Laird (1983)  Kulik, Bangert-Drowns & Kulik (1984)  Powers (1985)  Jones (1986). Fraker (1986/1987)  Halpin (1987)  Whitla (1988)  Snedecor (1989)  Bond (1989). Baydar (1990)  Becker (1990)  Smyth (1990)  Moore (1991)  Alderson & Wall (1992)  Powers (1993)  Oren (1993). Powers & Rock (1994)  Scholes, Lane (1997)   Allalouf & Ben Shakhar (1998)  Robb & Ercanbrack (1999)  McClain (1999)  Camara (1999, 2001, 2008) Stone & Lane (2000, 2003)  Din & Soldan (2001)  Briggs (2001)  Palmer (2002)  Briggs & Hansen (2004)  Cankoy & Ali Tut (2005)  Crocker (2005)  Allensworth, Correa, & Ponisciak (2008)  Domingue & Briggs (2009)  Koljatic & Silva (2014)  Early (2019)
31 Matt Barnum Daniel Koretz [interviewee] "There aren’t that many studies, but they’re very consistent. The inflation that does show up is sometimes absolutely massive. Worse, there is growing evidence that that problem is more severe for disadvantaged kids, creating the illusion of improved equity." Dismissive Why one Harvard professor calls American schools’ focus on testing a ‘charade’ Chalkbeat, January 19, 2018 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2018/01/19/why-one-harvard-professor-calls-american-schools-focus-on-testing-a-charade/ In fact the test prep, or test coaching, literature is vast and dates back decades, with meta-analyses of the literature dating back at least to the 1970s. There's even a What Works Clearinghouse summary of the (post World Wide Web) college admission test prep research literature:  https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/InterventionReports/wwc_act_sat_100416.pdf . See also: Gilmore (1927)  French & Dear (1959)  Ortar (1960)  Marron (1965)  ETS (1965). Messick & Jungeblut (1981)  Ellis, Konoske, Wulfeck, & Montague (1982)  DerSimonian and Laird (1983)  Kulik, Bangert-Drowns & Kulik (1984)  Powers (1985)  Jones (1986). Fraker (1986/1987)  Halpin (1987)  Whitla (1988)  Snedecor (1989)  Bond (1989). Baydar (1990)  Becker (1990)  Smyth (1990)  Moore (1991)  Alderson & Wall (1992)  Powers (1993)  Oren (1993). Powers & Rock (1994)  Scholes, Lane (1997)   Allalouf & Ben Shakhar (1998)  Robb & Ercanbrack (1999)  McClain (1999)  Camara (1999, 2001, 2008) Stone & Lane (2000, 2003)  Din & Soldan (2001)  Briggs (2001)  Palmer (2002)  Briggs & Hansen (2004)  Cankoy & Ali Tut (2005)  Crocker (2005)  Allensworth, Correa, & Ponisciak (2008)  Domingue & Briggs (2009)  Koljatic & Silva (2014)  Early (2019)
32 Matt Barnum   "This lesson may be the least surprising to policymakers. But as states try to help low-performing schools under the new federal education law, ESSA, they have a thin research base to draw from." Dismissive What we’ve learned: 5 lessons from education research to take into 2018 Chalkbeat, December 22, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/12/22/what-weve-learned-5-lessons-from-education-research-to-take-into-2018/  
33 Matt Barnum   "The study, which uses national data from 2005 to 2015 and was released this week through the National Bureau of Economic Research, appears to be the first to document how frequently teachers move states compared to those in other occupations. 1stness America’s teachers don’t move out of state much. That could be bad for students Chalkbeat, December 13, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/12/13/americas-teachers-dont-move-out-of-state-much-that-could-be-bad-for-students/  
34 Matt Barnum   "Chalkbeat combed through some of the most rigorous academic studies to get the answers." Denigrating Do school vouchers ‘work’? As the debate heats up, here’s what research really says Chalkbeat, July 12, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/07/12/do-school-vouchers-work-as-the-debate-heats-up-heres-what-research-really-says/  
35 Matt Barnum   "The only program that has been rigorously studied, Florida’s tax credit scholarship, ..." Denigrating Do school vouchers ‘work’? As the debate heats up, here’s what research really says Chalkbeat, July 12, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/07/12/do-school-vouchers-work-as-the-debate-heats-up-heres-what-research-really-says/  
36 Matt Barnum   "There is surprisingly little research on the effects of private school choice programs on segregation." Dismissive Do school vouchers ‘work’? As the debate heats up, here’s what research really says Chalkbeat, July 12, 2017 Chalkbeat funders (1) https://www.chalkbeat.org/posts/us/2017/07/12/do-school-vouchers-work-as-the-debate-heats-up-heres-what-research-really-says/  
37 Matt Barnum   "That also means that research on tax credit programs is scarce." Dismissive To Test or Not to Test: As Tax Credit Scholarships Expand, Questions About Accountability and Outcomes The 74, May 4, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/to-test-or-not-to-test-as-tax-credit-scholarships-expand-questions-about-accountability-and-outcomes/  
38 Matt Barnum Max Eden [interviewee] "Using anecdotal evidence and surveys, critics claim that restricting suspensions may have a deleterious effect on school safety and climate, particularly without support, resources, or broader structural reforms. That’s the argument put forth in a report focusing on New York City by Max Eden, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute," Denigrating The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
39 Matt Barnum   "Yet there are no firm data showing that this is true." Dismissive The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
40 Matt Barnum   "there are little convincing data showing that suspensions in and of themselves cause these negative outcomes." Dismissive, Denigrating The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
41 Matt Barnum   "Similarly, restorative justice approaches — which emphasize reconciliation of conflict over punishment and are backed by many as a fairer, more effective alternative — have a thin research base." Dismissive The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
42 Matt Barnum   "Careful studies are currently in the works regarding the impacts of the school disciplinary changes sweeping the country." Denigrating The School Discipline Revolution: How Policy and Rhetoric Outstrip Hard Evidence The 74, May 2, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-school-discipline-revolution-how-policy-and-rhetoric-outstrip-hard-evidence/  
43 Matt Barnum   "There has also been little systematic research on why certain types of curriculum and textbooks are more effective than others." Dismissive New Studies Suggest Choice of Curriculum and Textbooks Can Make a Big Difference for Students The 74, May 1, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/new-studies-suggest-choice-of-curriculum-and-textbooks-can-make-a-big-difference-for-students/ A simple search for academic journals with the word “curriculum” in their title unearths more than a dozen journals with around 6,000 articles dating back to 1968: Curriculum Inquiry, from 1968, >2,500 articles; Journal of Curriculum Studies, from 1968, >1,500 articles; Language, Culture, and Curriculum, from 1988, >450 articles; Curriculum Journal, from 1990, >700 articles; Curriculum and Teaching, from 1995, ~500 articles; Teachers and Curriculum, from 1997, >200 articles; Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, from 1998, >500 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, from 2004, >300 articles; Curriculum Matters, from 2005, ~100 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 2007–2014, >50; International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, from 2008, >150 articles; and Journal of Curriculum and Teaching, from 2013, >300 articles.
All that represents just a small proportion of research articles on curriculum that one would find if one searched all of the many thousands of education journals dating back a century, as well as the “grey literature” of graduate student theses, program evaluations, and governmental reports. A search on “curriculum” in ERIC gets 215,139 hits, in Google Scholar, 3,440,000 hits. To believe the dismissive review, one must believe that none among these many thousands of sources conducted a curricular evaluation or comparison. 
44 Matt Barnum Morgan Polikoff [interviewee] "One problem is simply a lack of information, according to Morgan Polikoff, a professor at the University of Southern California and co-author of one of the California studies. 'Very few states keep track of which districts adopt which books,' he said." Dismissive New Studies Suggest Choice of Curriculum and Textbooks Can Make a Big Difference for Students The 74, May 1, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/new-studies-suggest-choice-of-curriculum-and-textbooks-can-make-a-big-difference-for-students/ A simple search for academic journals with the word “curriculum” in their title unearths more than a dozen journals with around 6,000 articles dating back to 1968: Curriculum Inquiry, from 1968, >2,500 articles; Journal of Curriculum Studies, from 1968, >1,500 articles; Language, Culture, and Curriculum, from 1988, >450 articles; Curriculum Journal, from 1990, >700 articles; Curriculum and Teaching, from 1995, ~500 articles; Teachers and Curriculum, from 1997, >200 articles; Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, from 1998, >500 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, from 2004, >300 articles; Curriculum Matters, from 2005, ~100 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 2007–2014, >50; International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, from 2008, >150 articles; and Journal of Curriculum and Teaching, from 2013, >300 articles.
All that represents just a small proportion of research articles on curriculum that one would find if one searched all of the many thousands of education journals dating back a century, as well as the “grey literature” of graduate student theses, program evaluations, and governmental reports. A search on “curriculum” in ERIC gets 215,139 hits, in Google Scholar, 3,440,000 hits. To believe the dismissive review, one must believe that none among these many thousands of sources conducted a curricular evaluation or comparison. 
45 Matt Barnum David Steiner [interviewee] "'To date, research on the curriculum effect has told us little about what makes a particular curriculum or genre of curriculum especially effective or not,” wrote Steiner." Dismissive New Studies Suggest Choice of Curriculum and Textbooks Can Make a Big Difference for Students The 74, May 1, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/new-studies-suggest-choice-of-curriculum-and-textbooks-can-make-a-big-difference-for-students/ A simple search for academic journals with the word “curriculum” in their title unearths more than a dozen journals with around 6,000 articles dating back to 1968: Curriculum Inquiry, from 1968, >2,500 articles; Journal of Curriculum Studies, from 1968, >1,500 articles; Language, Culture, and Curriculum, from 1988, >450 articles; Curriculum Journal, from 1990, >700 articles; Curriculum and Teaching, from 1995, ~500 articles; Teachers and Curriculum, from 1997, >200 articles; Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, from 1998, >500 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, from 2004, >300 articles; Curriculum Matters, from 2005, ~100 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 2007–2014, >50; International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, from 2008, >150 articles; and Journal of Curriculum and Teaching, from 2013, >300 articles.
All that represents just a small proportion of research articles on curriculum that one would find if one searched all of the many thousands of education journals dating back a century, as well as the “grey literature” of graduate student theses, program evaluations, and governmental reports. A search on “curriculum” in ERIC gets 215,139 hits, in Google Scholar, 3,440,000 hits. To believe the dismissive review, one must believe that none among these many thousands of sources conducted a curricular evaluation or comparison. 
46 Matt Barnum David Steiner [interviewee] "'The paucity of evidence upon which sound instructional, purchasing, and policy decisions can be made is a matter of deep concern and urgent need,' wrote Steiner." Dismissive New Studies Suggest Choice of Curriculum and Textbooks Can Make a Big Difference for Students The 74, May 1, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/new-studies-suggest-choice-of-curriculum-and-textbooks-can-make-a-big-difference-for-students/ A simple search for academic journals with the word “curriculum” in their title unearths more than a dozen journals with around 6,000 articles dating back to 1968: Curriculum Inquiry, from 1968, >2,500 articles; Journal of Curriculum Studies, from 1968, >1,500 articles; Language, Culture, and Curriculum, from 1988, >450 articles; Curriculum Journal, from 1990, >700 articles; Curriculum and Teaching, from 1995, ~500 articles; Teachers and Curriculum, from 1997, >200 articles; Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue, from 1998, >500 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, from 2004, >300 articles; Curriculum Matters, from 2005, ~100 articles; Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 2007–2014, >50; International Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, from 2008, >150 articles; and Journal of Curriculum and Teaching, from 2013, >300 articles.
All that represents just a small proportion of research articles on curriculum that one would find if one searched all of the many thousands of education journals dating back a century, as well as the “grey literature” of graduate student theses, program evaluations, and governmental reports. A search on “curriculum” in ERIC gets 215,139 hits, in Google Scholar, 3,440,000 hits. To believe the dismissive review, one must believe that none among these many thousands of sources conducted a curricular evaluation or comparison. 
47 Matt Barnum   "The first-of-its-kind study, which I detail in greater depth here, was conducted by American University’s Constance Lindsay and Seth Gershenson working in tandem with Cassandra Hart of the University of California, Davis, and Nicholas Papageorge of Johns Hopkins University.  1stness 5 Things We Now Know About Teacher Diversity: What Researcher Constance Lindsay Has Found About Race in School The 74, April 10, 2017 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/5-things-we-now-know-about-teacher-diversity-what-researcher-constance-lindsay-has-found-about-race-in-school/ "Anna Egalite, a researcher at North Carolina State University who has also found benefits of teacher diversity in her own research, reviewed the study at The 74’s request. She praised the paper — which has not gone through formal peer review — as “interesting” and said she did not “see any obvious biases or glaring issues with the research design.” But, it turns out, Ms. Egalite is hardly independent. She works for [the ed reform establishment] Education Next, and "Anna J. Egalite holds a Ph.D. in Education Policy from the [ed reform establishment] University of Arkansas; she completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the [ed reform establishment] Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard University."
48 Matt Barnum Dan Goldhaber, Matt Kraft (interviewees) "Despite the rhetoric, there is little evidence suggesting that testing and evaluation policies have led to across-the-board reductions in teacher retention or job satisfaction. (I asked two researchers — Dan Goldhaber of the University of Washington and Matt Kraft of Brown University — and both agreed there isn’t a great deal of research on the question.)" Dismissive The 74 Fact-Check: Are Teachers Really Burning Out Because of Tougher Tests and Evaluations? The 74, October 12, 2016 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-74-fact-check-are-teachers-really-burning-out-due-to-tougher-tests-and-evaluations/  
49 Matt Barnum   "But decades of research now show that exit exams have not really raised standards, and have actually harmed disadvantaged students." Dismissive The Exit Exam Paradox: Did States Raise Standards So High They Then Had to Lower the Bar to Graduate? The 74, June 12, 2016 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-exit-exam-paradox-did-states-raise-standards-so-high-they-then-had-to-lower-the-bar-to-graduate/ Exit exams existed long before Barnum claims they did, even in the United States (in New York State and in many school districts. Contrary to Barnum's claims, much evidence has existed for a long time showing that exit exams tend to have beneficial effects on achievement near where the passing scores are set and no or negative effects far away from where the passing scores are set. Most countries with long-established exit exam programs set multiple targets--different curricular streams or different levels of rigor, so that all students may reach a target level relative to them. See, for example, https://nonpartisaneducation.org/Foundation/EffectiveTestingSystem.pdf
50 Matt Barnum   "The argument for exit exams is that they will push students to work harder, and ensure a diploma is not devalued in the job market. Remarkably, considering how quickly the practice spread, there is virtually no evidence that these benefits have come to pass — and a host of research shows negative effects of the policy." Dismissive The Exit Exam Paradox: Did States Raise Standards So High They Then Had to Lower the Bar to Graduate? The 74, June 12, 2016 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-exit-exam-paradox-did-states-raise-standards-so-high-they-then-had-to-lower-the-bar-to-graduate/ Just some of the relevant pre-2008 studies of the effects of minimum-competency or exit exams and the problems with a single passing score include those of Alvarez, Moreno, & Patrinos (2007); Grodsky & Kalogrides (2006); Audette (2005); Orlich (2003); StandardsWork (2003); Meisels, et al. (2003); Braun (2003); Rosenshine (2003); Tighe, Wang, & Foley (2002); Carnoy & Loeb (2002); Baumert & Demmrich (2001); Rosenblatt & Offer (2001); Phelps (2001); Toenjes, Dworkin, Lorence, & Hill (2000); Wenglinsky (2000); Massachusetts Finance Office (2000); DeMars (2000); Bishop (1999, 2000, 2001, & 2004); Grissmer & Flanagan(1998); Strauss, Bowes, Marks, & Plesko (1998); Frederiksen (1994); Ritchie & Thorkildsen (1994); Chao-Qun & Hui (1993); Potter & Wall (1992); Jacobson (1992); Rodgers, et al. (1991); Morris (1991); Winfield (1990); Ligon, Johnstone, Brightman, Davis, et al. (1990); Winfield (1987); Koffler (1987); Losack (1987); Marshall (1987); Hembree (1987); Mangino, Battaille, Washington, & Rumbaut (1986); Michigan Department of Education (1984); Ketchie (1984); Serow (1982); Indiana Education Department (1982); Brunton (1982); Paramore, et al. (1980); Ogden (1979); Down(2) (1979); Wellisch (1978); and Findley (1978).
51 Matt Barnum Sean Reardon (by email) “There is a general consensus in the research that high school exit exams increase dropout rates, [but] there is little or no evidence that they improve achievement or raise wages of students following high school.”  Dismissive The Exit Exam Paradox: Did States Raise Standards So High They Then Had to Lower the Bar to Graduate? The 74, June 12, 2016 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-exit-exam-paradox-did-states-raise-standards-so-high-they-then-had-to-lower-the-bar-to-graduate/ Just some of the relevant pre-2008 studies of the effects of minimum-competency or exit exams and the problems with a single passing score include those of Alvarez, Moreno, & Patrinos (2007); Grodsky & Kalogrides (2006); Audette (2005); Orlich (2003); StandardsWork (2003); Meisels, et al. (2003); Braun (2003); Rosenshine (2003); Tighe, Wang, & Foley (2002); Carnoy & Loeb (2002); Baumert & Demmrich (2001); Rosenblatt & Offer (2001); Phelps (2001); Toenjes, Dworkin, Lorence, & Hill (2000); Wenglinsky (2000); Massachusetts Finance Office (2000); DeMars (2000); Bishop (1999, 2000, 2001, & 2004); Grissmer & Flanagan(1998); Strauss, Bowes, Marks, & Plesko (1998); Frederiksen (1994); Ritchie & Thorkildsen (1994); Chao-Qun & Hui (1993); Potter & Wall (1992); Jacobson (1992); Rodgers, et al. (1991); Morris (1991); Winfield (1990); Ligon, Johnstone, Brightman, Davis, et al. (1990); Winfield (1987); Koffler (1987); Losack (1987); Marshall (1987); Hembree (1987); Mangino, Battaille, Washington, & Rumbaut (1986); Michigan Department of Education (1984); Ketchie (1984); Serow (1982); Indiana Education Department (1982); Brunton (1982); Paramore, et al. (1980); Ogden (1979); Down(2) (1979); Wellisch (1978); and Findley (1978).
52 Matt Barnum   "Much less discussion, though, at least among national commentators, has focused on the stakes for students.

It’s clear that high-school exit exams have very high stakes indeed."
Dismissive The Exit Exam Paradox: Did States Raise Standards So High They Then Had to Lower the Bar to Graduate? The 74, June 12, 2016 The 74 funders (2) https://www.the74million.org/article/the-exit-exam-paradox-did-states-raise-standards-so-high-they-then-had-to-lower-the-bar-to-graduate/ Aa abundance of research has focused on the effects of high-stakes tests on students. See, for example, https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15305058.2011.602920  Also, most high school exit exams have been targeted to a very low achievement level--8th or 9th grade. Contradicting himself, Barnum mentions 'minimum competency' exams elsewhere in his article."
53 Jill Barshay   "Andrew mined two large data sets in a way no researcher has done before…" Dismissive New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014      
54 Jill Barshay   "Most early research overstated how harmful it is to be held back a grade. It tended to point out that the struggling kids who repeat a grade don’t fare as well as kids who stay with their class, most of whom are not struggling. But that’s shoddy research." Denigrating New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014      
55 Jill Barshay   "In data analysis terms, this early research conflated the bad effects being held back with the bad effects of the underlying issue that led a school (or a parent) to hold the child back in the first place." Denigrating New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014      
56 Jill Barshay   "Even as the low quality research kept showing that holding kids back was bad, a growing chorus of critics urged schools to end “social promotion,” Denigrating New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014      
57 Jill Barshay   "Those urban experiments attracted sophisticated researchers. Brian Jacob and Lars Lefgren studied students in Chicago, where the decision to hold a student back was based on a test score." Denigrating New research suggests repeating elementary school grades — even kindergarten — is harmful Hechinger Report, Education by the Numbers, October 13, 2014      
58 Scott J. Cech Daniel Koretz [interviewee] “'If you tell people that performance on that tested sample is what matters, that’s what they worry about, so you can get inappropriate responses in the classroom and inflated test scores,' he said."    Mr. Koretz pointed to research in the 1990s on the state standardized test then used in Kentucky, ... " Dismissive Testing Expert Sees ‘Illusions of Progress’ Under NCLB Education Week, October 1, 2008     Koretz's score inflation studies typically employ no controls for test administration or test content factors. One of his tests might be administered with tight security and the other with none at all. One of his tests might focus on one subject area and the other test another topic entirely. He writes as if all of his "left out" variables could not possibly matter. Moreover, he ignores completely the huge experimental literature on test prep in favor of his apples-to-oranges comparison studies.  
59 Scott J. Cech Daniel Koretz [interviewee] "Mr. Koretz said the relative dearth to date of comparative studies on large-scale state assessments isn’t for lack of trying. He said he and other scholars have often been rebuffed after approaching officials about the possibility of studying their assessment systems. Dismissive Testing Expert Sees ‘Illusions of Progress’ Under NCLB Education Week, October 1, 2008     Externally administered high-stakes testing is widely reviled among US educationists. It strains credulity that Koretz can not find one district out of the many thousands to cooperate with him to discredit testing.  
60 Scott J. Cech Daniel Koretz [interviewee] There have not been a lot of studies of this,” Mr. Koretz said, “for the simple reason that it’s politically rather hard to do, to come to a state chief and say, ‘I’d like the chance to see whether your test scores are inflated.’?” Dismissive Testing Expert Sees ‘Illusions of Progress’ Under NCLB Education Week, October 1, 2008     Externally administered high-stakes testing is widely reviled among US educationists. It strains credulity that Koretz can not find one district out of the many thousands to cooperate with him to discredit testing.  
61 Debra Viadero Daniel Koretz [interviewee] “...all of the researchers interviewed agreed with FairTest’s contention that research evidence supporting the use of high-stakes tests as a means of improving schools is thin.”   Dismissive FairTest report questions reliance on high-stakes testing by states Debra Viadero, Education Week.January 28, 1998.     In fact, a very large number of studies do so. See, for example, https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0193841X19865628#abstract & https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15305058.2011.602920 ; https://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Resources/QuantitativeList.htm ; https://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Resources/SurveyList.htm ; https://nonpartisaneducation.org/Review/Resources/QualitativeList.htm  
                   
      Author cites (and accepts without checking) someone elses dismissive review            
      Cite selves or colleagues in the group, but dismiss or denigrate all other work            
Falsely claim that research has only recently been done on topic.
                 
                 
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