Author Co-author(s) Dismissive Quote type Title Source Link1
1 Matthew M. Chingos   "This report provides new evidence on which groups of students are likely to benefit the most from a policy that eliminates tuition and fees at public colleges and universities. This analysis is meant as a starting point for considering the potential implications of making college free...." 1stness Who would benefit most from free college?, p.1 Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (April 21, 2016) http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2016/04/21-who-would-benefit-most-from-free-college-chingos/download-the-paper.pdf
2 Matthew M. Chingos   "Not all analyses of NAEP scores ignore the role of student demographics in test-score performance, but what is missing from this discussion is a systematic framework for assessing how much student achievement varies across observationally similar states and the extent to which changes in state performance on NAEP are accounted for by changes in the demographics of the state (Loveless 2011)." Dismissive Breaking the curve: Promises and pitfalls of using NAEP data to assess the state role in student achievement, p.2 Urban Institute, Washington, DC (October, 2015) http://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/alfresco/publication-pdfs/2000484-Breaking-the-Curve-Promises-and-Pitfalls-of-Using-NAEP-Data-to-Assess-the-State-Role-in-Student-Achievement.pdf
3 Matthew M. Chingos   "This report begins to fill this gap with a detailed analysis of the most recent (2013) NAEP data available and of changes over the previous decade (2003–13)." 1stness Breaking the curve: Promises and pitfalls of using NAEP data to assess the state role in student achievement, p.2 Urban Institute, Washington, DC (October, 2015) http://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/alfresco/publication-pdfs/2000484-Breaking-the-Curve-Promises-and-Pitfalls-of-Using-NAEP-Data-to-Assess-the-State-Role-in-Student-Achievement.pdf
4 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst, Katharine M. Lindquist "Research emerging over the past decade has provided strong evidence of the substantial effects that teachers have on their students’ achievement. More recent findings suggest that principals also have meaningful, albeit smaller, effects on student achievement. However, there is almost no quantitative research that addresses the impact of superintendents on student achievement. This report provides some of the first empirical evidence on the topic." Dismissive School superintendents: Vital or irrelevant?, 2014, p.1 Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (September 2014)  
5 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst, Katharine M. Lindquist "Superintendents may well be as important to student achievement as the popular perception, their portrayal in the media, and their salaries suggest, but there is almost no quantitative research that addresses their impact. Existing research consists largely of journalistic case studies that tell the story of superintendents who are thought to be successful, and analyses of survey data that attempt to identify characteristics of effective district leadership." Dismissive School superintendents: Vital or irrelevant?, 2014, p.2 Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (September 2014)  
6 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst, Katharine M. Lindquist "Research made possible in the last decade by the creation of state longitudinal education databases and increases in computing power has led to strong evidence of substantial teacher effects on their students’ achievement. A more recent body of research suggests that principals have meaningful effects too, although they are more difficult to measure. We are aware of no existing research that similarly systematically examines the impact of superintendents on student achievement." Dismissive School superintendents: Vital or irrelevant?, 2014, p.2 Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (September 2014)  
7 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst, Katharine M. Lindquist "The methods we deploy to address all except the first, purely descriptive, question are capable of reducing the substantial zone of empirical uncertainty around these previously unexplored questions. However, our methods do not support strong causal conclusions because they depend on statistical controls that are only as good as the data available to us." Dismissive School superintendents: Vital or irrelevant?, 2014, p.4 Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (September 2014)  
8 Matthew M. Chingos Elizabeth J. Akers "Earlier this year, we released a report aimed at injecting some much-needed evidence into what has become an often-hysterical public debate about student loan debt." Denigrating Student loan update: A first look at the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (September 2014)  
9 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren "Online instruction is quickly gaining in importance in U.S. higher education, but little rigorous evidence exists as to its effect on student learning."  Denigrating Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, Abstract Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
10 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren "The rapid growth in the adoption of online learning has been accompanied by an unfortunate lack of rigorous efforts to evaluate these new instructional models…" Denigrating Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.3 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
11 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren There have been literally thousands of studies of “online learning,” but the vast majority do not meet minimal standards of evidence (U.S. Department of Education, 2010) and only a handful involve semester-long courses in higher education (Jaggars and Bailey, 2010).  Denigrating Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.3 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
12 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren There have been literally thousands of studies of “online learning,” but the vast majority do not meet minimal standards of evidence (U.S. Department of Education, 2010) and only a handful involve semester-long courses in higher education (Jaggars and Bailey, 2010).  Denigrating Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.4 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
13 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren "An important exception is Figlio, Rush, and Yin’s (Forthcoming) randomized experiment…" Dismissive Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.4 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
14 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren This study fills a significant gap in the literature about the relative effectiveness of different learning formats by providing the first evidence from randomized experiments of hybrid instruction conducted at a significant scale across multiple public university campuses. Dismissive Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.5 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
15 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren This study fills a significant gap in the literature about the relative effectiveness of different learning formats by providing the first evidence from randomized experiments of hybrid instruction conducted at a significant scale across multiple public university campuses. 1stness Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.5 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014)  
16 Matthew M. Chingos William G. Bowen, Kelly A. Lack, Thomas I. Nygren "Given the pressing need for institutions to use limited resources as effectively as possible, the research reported here is concerned with educational costs as well, which have also received limited attention in prior research related to the effectiveness of online instruction." Dismissive Interactive learning online at public universities: Evidence from a six-campus randomized trial, p.5 Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33(1): 94–111 (2014) http://www.mattchingos.com/ILO_prepub.pdf
17 Matthew M. Chingos Guido Schwerdt "However, there is no prior credible evidence on the quality of virtual courses compared to in-person courses in U.S. secondary education." Denigrating Virtual Schooling and Student Learning: Evidence from the Florida Virtual School, Abstract Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series, PEPG 14-02 http://docplayer.net/1538260-Virtual-schooling-and-student-learning-evidence-from-the-florida-virtual-school.html
18 Matthew M. Chingos Guido Schwerdt "This research says little, however, about the potential impact of virtual schooling on student outcomes." Dismissive Virtual Schooling and Student Learning: Evidence from the Florida Virtual School, p.2 Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series, PEPG 14-02 http://docplayer.net/1538260-Virtual-schooling-and-student-learning-evidence-from-the-florida-virtual-school.html
19 Matthew M. Chingos Guido Schwerdt "There is no existing high-quality research on the impact of fully online high school courses on student achievement in the U.S. This likely is due in large part to the fact that measuring the impact of virtual education is rife with methodological challenges." Denigrating Virtual Schooling and Student Learning: Evidence from the Florida Virtual School, p.4 Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series, PEPG 14-02 http://docplayer.net/1538260-Virtual-schooling-and-student-learning-evidence-from-the-florida-virtual-school.html
20 Matthew M. Chingos   "Unfortunately, there is little comprehensive up-to-date information on the costs of assessment systems currently in place throughout the country. This report seeks to fill this void by providing the most current, comprehensive evidence on state-level cost of assessment systems, based on new data gathered from state contracts with testing vendors.” Denigrating Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems, p.1 Brookings Institution. Washington, DC.  (November, 2012) http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/11/29-cost-of-assessment-chingos/11_assessment_chingos_final_new.pdf
21 Matthew M. Chingos   “[Other] Estimates of these costs are based primarily on assumptions and guesswork…" Denigrating Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems, p.4 Brookings Institution. Washington, DC.  (November, 2012) http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/11/29-cost-of-assessment-chingos/11_assessment_chingos_final_new.pdf
22 Matthew M. Chingos   "The most comprehensive nationwide data were collected about a decade ago, in separate investigations by Caroline Hoxby and the Pew Center on the States." Dismissive Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems, p.4 Brookings Institution. Washington, DC.  (November, 2012) http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/11/29-cost-of-assessment-chingos/11_assessment_chingos_final_new.pdf
23 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst "Evidence shows that instructional materials have large effects on student learning. However, little research exists on the effectiveness of most instructional materials, and very little systematic information has been collected on which materials are being used in which schools." Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.1 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
24 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst "Administrators are prevented from making better choices of instructional materials by the lack of evidence on the effectiveness of the materials currently in use." Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.1 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
25 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst "This scandalous lack of information…" Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.1 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
26 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “For example, the vast majority of elementary school mathematics curricula examined by the Institute of Education Sciences What Works Clearinghouse either have no studies of their effectiveness or have no studies that meet reasonable standards of evidence.” p. 1 Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.1 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
27 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “The final limitation is that most existing studies of the effectiveness of instructional materials are carried out with small samples of convenience and ill-defined comparison conditions that compromise the usefulness of the results for individuals charged with choosing instructional materials.” p. 6 Denigrating Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.6 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
28 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “With such data we could begin to look for patterns that are associated with higher levels of student achievement, and we could fill some of the gaps and lessen some of the uncertainties that are associated with the existing body of studies of instructional materials.” pp. 6-7 Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, pp.6-7 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
29 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “The opening quote from Lee J. Cronbach indicates that we didn’t know what instructional materials were in use in the 1950s. It is more than a half-century later and we still don’t know.p. 8 Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.8 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
30 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “The only existing study that links student achievement data to instructional materials used across an entire state is Rachana Bhatt and Cory Koedel’s analysis of data from Indiana.” p. 21 Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.21 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
31 Matthew M. Chingos Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst “Given the current dearth of information on instructional materials in use, new data is likely to encourage new research in this area.” p. 21 Dismissive Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core, p.21 Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, April 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/4/10%20curriculum%20chingos%20whitehurst/0410_curriculum_chingos_whitehurst.pdf
32 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “[T]there is little direct evidence that administrators’ ability to recognize teacher effectiveness influences their personnel decisions.” p. 2 Dismissive Promotion and Reassignment in Public School Districts: How Do Schools Respond to Differences in Teacher Effectiveness? Program on Education Policy and Governance, Working Papers Series (PEPG 10-21), Dec. 2010  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-21_chingos_west.pdf
33 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West Evidence on principal effects on student achievement is limited. . . .” p. 2 Dismissive Promotion and Reassignment in Public School Districts: How Do Schools Respond to Differences in Teacher Effectiveness? Program on Education Policy and Governance, Working Papers Series (PEPG 10-21), Dec. 2010  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-21_chingos_west.pdf
34 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “[T]he coefficients on the control variables (reported in Appendix Table 2) also provide what is to our knowledge the first evidence from a statewide database on the correlates of entry into positions of school leadership.” p. 17 1stness Promotion and Reassignment in Public School Districts: How Do Schools Respond to Differences in Teacher Effectiveness? Program on Education Policy and Governance, Working Papers Series (PEPG 10-21), Dec. 2010  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-21_chingos_west.pdf
35 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “The results presented above represent the first systematic evidence on the relationship between teacher effectiveness and job transitions within public school districts.” p. 22 1stness Promotion and Reassignment in Public School Districts: How Do Schools Respond to Differences in Teacher Effectiveness? Program on Education Policy and Governance, Working Papers Series (PEPG 10-21), Dec. 2010  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-21_chingos_west.pdf
36 Matthew M. Chingos   ”Although there are reasons to expect that state governments may well improve student achievement by providing resources that must be spent on a specific policy such as CSR, there is little empirical evidence on this question.” p. 1 Dismissive The Impact of a Universal Class-Size Reduction Policy: Evidence from Florida’s Statewide Mandate∗ Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series  Program (PEPG 10-03), last revised: August 2010 http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-03_Chingos.pdf
37 Matthew M. Chingos   “Thus, there is very little evidence on the overall effects of large-scale CSR policies and essentially no evidence on the effect of CSR as compared to equivalent additional resources.” p. 3 Dismissive The Impact of a Universal Class-Size Reduction Policy: Evidence from Florida’s Statewide Mandate∗ Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series  Program (PEPG 10-03), last revised: August 2010 http://www.hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/PEPG10-03_Chingos.pdf
38 Matthew M. Chingos   “The emerging consensus depends upon a limited number of studies, however, so it is worth continuing to scrutinize available information to see whether findings can be replicated as well as to explore certain lacunae in the literature.” pp. 2-3 Dismissive It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
39 Matthew M. Chingos   “[M]ost prior studies of pre-service training, for example, have relied upon crude indicators of the type of training a teacher has received. . . .” p.3 Denigrating It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
40 Matthew M. Chingos   Prior estimations of on-the-job training (years of experience) also suffer from certain limitations. . . . In short, the effects of on-the-job training over the teaching life cycle have yet to be precisely estimated.” p. 3 Denigrating It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
41 Matthew M. Chingos   “Prior econometric research has generally failed to detect positive impacts of pre-service teacher preparation programs on student learning.” p. 5 Dismissive It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
42 Matthew M. Chingos   In short, there is no state-of-the-art, statewide study of the relative effectiveness of specific university teacher preparation programs.” Denigrating It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
43 Matthew M. Chingos   “Despite the array of studies that have estimated the effectiveness returns for teachers to on-the-job training, certain avenues have not been fully explored. No previous study has detected a point at which the returns to experience turn downward, a point of some policy interest since teacher salary schedules generally reward teachers for additional year of experience.” p. 9 Dismissive It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
44 Matthew M. Chingos   “[M]ost studies do not estimate the impact of the acquisition of an advanced degree by comparing individual teacher performances before and after the year the degree was acquired.” p. 11 Denigrating It’s Easier to Pick a Good Teacher than to Train One: Familiar and New Results on the Correlates of Teacher Effectiveness  Paper prepared for a symposium sponsored by the Economics of Education Review, December 10, 2010 http://hks.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/Papers/2010-22_PEPG_Chingos_Peterson.pdf
45 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “There is a substantial literature on the correlates of teacher retention but far less research on the link between retention and effectiveness. Indeed, to our knowledge, only three studies have examined the relationship between mobility and attrition patterns and teacher quality using direct measures of teachers’ classroom effectiveness. pp. 1-2 Dismissive Teacher Effectiveness, Mobility, and Attrition in Florida Chapter 11 in Matthew G. Springer, ed., Performance Incentives: Their Growing Impact on American K-12 Education, Brookings Institution Press, 2009 http://www.mattchingos.com/West-Chingos_prepub.pdf
46 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “This chapter, which presents a descriptive analysis of the early career paths of new elementary school teachers in the state of Florida from 2001–02 to 2005–06, extends this emerging line of research in several ways.” p.2 1stness Teacher Effectiveness, Mobility, and Attrition in Florida Chapter 11 in Matthew G. Springer, ed., Performance Incentives: Their Growing Impact on American K-12 Education, Brookings Institution Press, 2009 http://www.mattchingos.com/West-Chingos_prepub.pdf
47 Matthew M. Chingos Martin R. West “While much more research is needed on the extent to which teachers respond to the incentives created by such policies, combining the two approaches—for example, by offering larger performance incentives in hard-to-staff schools—may represent a promising approach to improving both overall teacher quality and the allocation of the most effective teachers across schools.” p.19 Dismissive Teacher Effectiveness, Mobility, and Attrition in Florida Chapter 11 in Matthew G. Springer, ed., Performance Incentives: Their Growing Impact on American K-12 Education, Brookings Institution Press, 2009 http://www.mattchingos.com/West-Chingos_prepub.pdf
Author cites (and accepts without checking) someone elses dismissive review
Cite selves or colleagues in the group, but dismiss or denigrate all other work
Falsely claim that research has only recently been done on topic.